Eclipse Record – Wartime songs of 1914

I selected this to play as part of a performance at the Glynn Vivian gallery in Swansea for the ‘End of Empire‘ exhibition preview.
The record includes the famous wartime songs (mentioned in this previous post) ‘Pack up your troubles in your old kit-bag’  written by Welshmen George Asaf (aka George Henry Powell) and his brother Felix Powell, and ‘Take Me Back To Dear Old Blighty’  written by Swansea born Fred Godfrey (aka Llewelyn Williams).

1930s 8 inch Eclipse gramophone record playing on a Numark PT01.

At first manufactured by the Crystalate company (later taken over by Decca) for the Woolworth store chain, Eclipse was launched as a replacement for the Victory label. It was the first to be packaged in a brown paper sleeve, and featured dynamic promotional designs. Even so, the product was still pegged at a low price, even through the ‘slump’ or depression-era years of the early 1930s, finally disappearing in 1935.
Text from http://www.tedstaunton.com

Advertisements

Freedom Fanfare

The Band of the Nigeria Police - Freedom Fanfare

Theres a nice write up on the Soul Safari blog here https://soulsafari.wordpress.com/2010/01/21/freedom-fanfare-the-band-of-the-nigerian-police/

I found my copy in Cardigan market while in the process of moving into town back in 2010.  I used it in the first mix in the new studio and the recording became the soundtrack to the second short film documenting the move.

Mixes at an Exhibition

I was invited to create a live mix for the opening of Strange Eden, an exhibition of work by James Moore in Oriel Mwldan Gallery, Cardigan.

Records were selected in response to the work on display and following a few conversations with James ahead of the event.

Records used include: Tomita – Pictures at an Exhibition; Emerson, Lake and Palmer – Pictures at an Exhibition; Debussy – La Mer; Jean Michel Jarre Live; BBC Sound Effects No6; RCA Home Movie Sound Effects; Landscape III – You Know how to Hurt me; Top Gun OST; I also used a cassette tape of VU-3D for Sinclair ZX Spectrum.

Loops were found randomly from the records using bits of wire to hold the tone arms.